What Do You Have to Lose?

What Do You Have to Lose?

Are you suffering from any form of dementia, Alzheimer’s or memory loss? Or do you care for someone with these challenges?

If so, you have become quite intimate with loss.
So what do you have to lose in exploring new options to reverse the loss of your mind or the mind of the one you love?

The statistics are showing the need for caregivers is growing at a disturbing rate. Our loved ones are living longer and instead of having quality of life they are needing more and more care.

I believe we can change this paradigm.

Do you believe it is possible?
Or would you like to believe it is possible?

My work preventing and reversing Alzheimer’s has led me to not only see the possibility becoming reality but is also igniting new projects and research that will offer compelling results resulting in hope and true change.

The upcoming intensive is just one of those projects and it is happening soon! This August we will bring in skilled CranioSacral practitioners to work every day on chosen clients.

It is truly a win-win situation.

The clients will receive treatments that will help them in the very malady challenging their lives; CST therapists will be part of a pioneering mission; and Upledger Institute hosting the intensive will increase awareness of their life changing technique; and the results will be subject to the highest standard of research assessment and analysis which will make a solid stand for the possibility of reversing Alzheimers.

And all of this will bear fruit for the caregiver by not only offering a technique you or they can learn easily but also changing the ever growing demand for the all consuming care that Alzheimer’s disease demands.

An intensive like this has never been done before.

Right now the mortality rate of Alzheimer’s disease is 100%, what is there to lose if we could demonstrate that the rate could be reduced to 80%, or 50% or even 20%? And with a modality that is non-invasive.

The stark reality is that left untreated those in the mid stage of Alzheimer’s will eventually require full time care which will bankrupt most families.

Here is an outline of 5 potential benefits of our intensive for caregivers:

  1. Time. The quality of life for loved ones will be extended and improved. This means less time spent caretaking, more time for the caregiver, less worry.
  2. Money. The loved one has a larger window to remain at home which has been shown to give greater happiness and also save the ever increasing cost of senior care centers. This is quite possibly a savings of 3-8000.00 per month!
  3. Survival. If our intensive shows us what we intend, CST will become a forerunner in arresting the mental and physical decline associated with Alzheimer’s. As caregiver you have helped save a life.
  4. Quality of Life. Reduction of symptoms means you have your loved one available to enjoy life with you. So not only do they live longer but you have the opportunity to enjoy life together.
  5. Family Growth. Oftentimes the demands of intense caregiving falls upon one available individual, and at times the discernment needed among the family can be challenging and tense. They are difficult waters to navigate. The more your aging loved one has use of their faculties and quality of life, the less pressure is upon the family. Perhaps even more members will step forward to take on small tasks to lighten the load for all and even contribute to the family coming together in new ways.

With all the possible benefits, what do you have to lose?

NOTE: If you would like more information about participating in our intensive email me at info@bodyenergy.net

Honoring The Elder

Honoring The Elder

Many cultures have a custom of honoring those older in community as elders. And elder has a connotation to it that leaves a sense in the mouth of wisdom, life experience, and worthiness of respect because they have made the journey for many years. In this connotation is a belief the persons have a value meant to be passed on. It is as though they have reconnoitered the land we are just beginning to tread.

In America the place of our seniors has been challenged. We are a free market society where each individual is honored for having control over their future, their success and what constitutes their personal stability. Working hard and working smart for what we want is esteemed highly, and considered the way success is achieved.

This is not unilaterally true, but there is truth in the observation. For years and years people of other nations have seen America as the place of ‘freedom and democracy,’ a place where one can achieve their dreams. These are qualities worth preserving as a way we can mature as a nation. The downside of this personal agency is the relative dismissal of the community as a collection of people all having something valuable to bring to the table. And when someone loses their ability to perform in the ways society sees as valuable, that very someone may be considered a burden or even one in need.

The middle ground is the constant invitation. To preserve free market and to preserve the value of each person based on another set of criteria instead of only one set of social norms.

Could we possibly create a new way to look at the seniors in our midst? Even if they may not be able, or want to, run a corporation to make multi-million dollar profits, they do have unique gifts to share to remind us of what life is about.

As the American dream breaks down before our eyes we have the chance to let the shakeup lead us to a new paradigm. One factor would be to redefine our relationship to those aging among us.

Elders. We could begin to see seniors as elders. The very word differs from the latter. Senior denotes a chronological fact. Elder connotes a relationship to those around them.

Beginning to shift this term leads to practical implications. It leads us to ask different questions. Instead of asking, ‘What nursing home will take care of our seniors?’ We could ask, ‘What type of medical care would preserve the health of our elders so we can continue to have them and their gifts among us?’

This new question leads down a very new road, already paved with alternative modalities for health, new research in the field of gerontology, and even options of social paradigms offering a quality of life for our elders happening in our very midst.

Let’s ask new questions, therein we find answers to a new paradigm to honor our elders.